Scottish Borders

The Towns that are in the Scottish Borders area have previously been a part of England as the marker for the border between Scotland and England has moved over history using a physical presence to define where the border was. In history it has been a river once the River Forth then the River Esk and now the River Tweed. The best example is at the bridge on the far side of Coldstream where the signs show welcome to Scotland and on the far side welcome to England. 

The Scottish Border region has the famous river Tweed that carves its way from west to East with all the water from the hills flowing into it as it makes its way to the North Sea at Berwick- Upon-Tweed.

The last circa 180 miles of the Tweed is marks the Border between Scotland and England and one of the most scenic spots is at the bridge that crosses over the Tweed at Coldstream where a house stands where English couples would runaway to be married (This was before Gretna Green was used. The Marriage house still stands in the middle of nowhere as it is between the Welcome to Scotland sign and you are leaving England sign.

The main Border towns are situated in the central area of the Scottish Borders. A road that runs from just outside Edinburgh in the east starting from the A720 which will take you 50 minutes to the main area or by train on the Borders Railway from Waverley Station to Tweedbank which is close to Abbotsford House where Sir Walter Scott once Lived The main towns in the Borders are Melrose Galashiels, Selkirk, Hawick, Jedburgh, Kelso, Newtown St. Boswells, St Boswells, Peebles, Coldstream, Tweedbank are located. While visiting the Borders carry on to Moffat which is in Dumfries and Galloway where you can buy the famous Moffat Toffee. Just on the Border of Scotland and England.